Uncommon Bodies release day blitz #giveaway

NEW RELEASE: UnCommon Bodies is a collection of stories curated by

Pavarti K. Tyler that span across genres to explore the lives of the odd, the unbelievable, and the


UCB CoverSUMMARY: Step right up to the modern freakshow

— We have mermaids, monsters, and more. You won’t be disappointed, but you may not get out alive.

UnCommon Bodies presents a collection of 20 beautifully irreverent stories which blend the surreal and

the mundane. Imagine a world where magic exists, where the physical form has the power to heal or

repulse, where a deal with the devil means losing so much more than your soul.

PRE-ORDER NOW for Release on 11/24.  FREE on Kindle

Unlimited. Amazon.com

INCLUDES STORIES BY: Philip Harris, Sessha Batto, Robb Grindstaff, Brent Meske, Sally

Basmajian, Robert Pope, Keira Michelle Telford, Jordanne FullerMichael Harris Cohen, Deanne Charlton,

P.K. Tyler ,Bey Deckard , Vasil Tuchkov, Laxmi Hariharan, Samantha Warren, Rebecca Poole, Daniel

Arthur Smith, S.M. Johnson, Kim Wells, Christopher Godsoe, and Bob Williams

You can see the full summaries of all the stories on GoodReads: smarturl.it/UCBGoodreads

To Celebrate, the authors are hosting a Facebook Party on 11/24 Join the Fun! https://www.facebook.com/events/495176633996990/

And there’s more!  What?  Yep!  The Authors are also giving away a Kindle!  Enter below:

a Rafflecopter


The Buried Giant by Kazuo Ishiguro #review



Title : The Buried Giant
Author: Kazuo Ishiguro
Published: 2015
Pages:: 345
Format:: Print


An extraordinary new novel from the author of Never Let Me Go and the Booker Prize-winning The Remains of the Day.

“You’ve long set your heart against it, Axl, I know. But it’s time now to think on it anew. There’s a journey we must go on, and no more delay…”

The Buried Giant begins as a couple set off across a troubled land of mist and rain in the hope of finding a son they have not seen in years.

Sometimes savage, often intensely moving, Kazuo Ishiguro’s first novel in nearly a decade is about lost memories, love, revenge, and war.

This is my first Kazuo Ishiguro novel and didn’t want to pass up the opportunity to try an author who has such a brilliant reputation. I am not sure if this was the best of his to begin with however. While I enjoyed this book and the writing is excellent I found it slow at times. The older couple and their journey at times held my interest and some moments were delightfully rich and mythical. Some moments felt like the journey and therefor the tale just plodded along.

Memory and what it means, part of what makes us who we are was examined closely in the story and again while good at moments in the beginning in particular I feel unsatisfied with this book.

Recommended to smarter people than I, who are able to interpret symbolism to a far greater degree than I am apparently able.


Thank you to Allen & Unwin for the review copy.

The Kind Worth Killing by @PeterSwanson3 #review

Peter Swanson


Title : The Kind Worth Killing
AuthorPeter Swanson
Published: 2015
Pages:: 320
Format:: Ebook


A devious tale of psychological suspense involving sex, deception, and an accidental encounter that leads to murder. This is a modern re-imagining of Patricia Highsmith’s classic Strangers on a Train from the author of the acclaimed The Girl with a Clock for a Heart.

On a night flight from London to Boston, Ted Severson meets the mysterious Lily Kintner. Sharing one too many martinis, the strangers begin to play a game of truth, revealing intimate details about themselves. Ted talks about his marriage and his wife Miranda, who he’s sure is cheating on him. But their game turns dark when Ted jokes that he could kill Miranda for what she’s done. Lily, without missing a beat, says calmly, “I’d like to help.”

From there, Ted and Lily’s twisted bond grows stronger as they plot Miranda’s demise, but soon these co-conspirators are embroiled in a game of cat-and-mouse–one they both cannot survive–with a shrewd and very determined detective on their tail.

I’d read The Girl With A Clock For A Heart by Peter Swanson as I thought it sounded amazing. I was disappointed by that one as I didn’t feel like it quite worked. When the chance to read The Kind Worth Killing came along I was hesitant as I was concerned about being in the same predicament. Sounds great but will I actually enjoy it. I’m glad I gave Peter Swanson another go as The Kind Worth Killing was the tight intriguing phycological thriller that I’d hoped his first one would be.

The story told from alternating perspectives pulls the reader in and makes one look at murder through the eyes of people who well don’t have quite an issue with it as the average Joe may. Everyone dies after all. With numerous plot twists the story could have fallen apart but it continued to be gripping and a highly enjoyable read. Great and diverse characters with a story that had me wanting more. I do recommend this one if you haven’t yet read Peter Swanson. Its the one to go with for sure.

Thank you to HarperCollins for the review copy.

Arachnophile by Betty Rocksteady #review @bettyrocksteady




Title : Arachnophile
AuthorBetty Rocksteady
Published: 2015
Pages:: 63
Format:: Ebook


Hatred and desire collide when the girl next door is a giant spider

Alex’s arachnophobia may be old fashioned, but he’s able to live a life of relative peace despite it. That all changes when a spider moves in next door. His girlfriend is sick of his attitude and begs him to give the new neighbor a chance. He overcomes his fear, but finds a twisted sexuality in its place. His attraction to the spider affects all areas of his life, and changes everything he thought he knew.

I love the NBAS and have read some excellent work, this is again one of those times. I still get surprised, pleasantly so by how great and original some authors are. Arachnophile is a story that had me enthralled and also emotionally invested. Touching, sad and curious it was like Alice falling down the rabbit hole into a world so similar to ours and yet so different. Bugs and humans living side by side with discrimination of species, mind numbing work and relationships that are unique to say the least. Relatable and yet curious and curiouser.

Well written and enjoyable. Highly recommended.

Thank you to the author for the review copy.

Everything She Forgot by Lisa Ballantyne book tour #giveaway

EveryThingSheForgot PB C (1)



by Lisa Ballantyne


Lisa Ballantyne, international bestselling author of The Guilty One, delivers a compelling domestic thriller with impeccably observed characters and masterful edge-of-your-seat storytelling in a novel that leaps between past and present with page-turning finesse.


They’re calling it the worst pile-up in London history. Driving home, Margaret Holloway has her mind elsewhere—on a troubled student, her daughter’s acting class, the next day’s meeting—when she’s rear-ended and trapped in the wreckage. Just as she begins to panic, a disfigured stranger pulls her from the car just seconds before it’s engulfed in flames. Then he simply disappears.

Though she escapes with minor injuries, Margaret feels that something’s wrong. She’s having trouble concentrating. Her emotions are running wild. More than that, flashbacks to the crash are also dredging up lost associations from her childhood, fragments of events that were wiped from her memory. Whatever happened, she didn’t merely forget—she chose to forget. And somehow, Margaret knows deep down that it’s got something to do with the man who saved her life.

As Margaret uncovers a mystery with chilling implications for her family and her very identity, Everything She Forgot winds through a riveting dual narrative and asks the question: How far would you go to hide the truth—from yourself…?




Margaret Holloway

Thursday, December 5, 2013


Margaret Holloway wrapped her scarf around her face before she walked out into the school parking lot. It was not long after four o’clock, but a winter pall had shifted over London. It was dusk already, wary streetlamps casting premature light onto the icy pavements. Snowflakes had begun to swirl and Margaret blinked as one landed on her eyelashes. The first snow of the year always brought a silence, dampening down all sound. She felt gratefully alone, walking out into the new darkness, hers the only footprints on the path. She had been too hot inside and the cold air was welcome.

Her car was on the far side of the parking lot and she wasn’t wearing proper shoes for the weather, although she had on her long brown eiderdown coat. She had heard on the radio that it

was to be the worst winter in the past fifty years.

It was only a few weeks until her thirty-sixth birthday, which always fell during the school holidays, but she had so much to do before the end of term. She was carrying a large handbag, heavy with documents to read for a meeting tomorrow. She was one of two deputy head teachers at Byron Academy, and the only woman on the senior management team, although one of the four assistant heads below Margaret was female. The day had left her tense and electrified. Her mind was fresh popcorn in hot oil, noisy with all the things she still had to do.

She walked faster than she might have done in such wintry conditions, because she was angry.


“Don’t do this,” she had just pleaded with the head teacher, Malcolm Harris.

“It’s a serious breach,” Malcolm had said, leaning right back in his chair and putting two hands beside his head, as if surrendering, and showing a clear circle of sweat at each armpit. “I know how you feel about him. I know he’s one of your ‘projects’ but—”

“It’s not that . . . it’s just that permanent exclusion could ruin him. Stephen’s come so far.”

“I think you’ll find he’s known as Trap.”

“And I don’t think of him as a project,” Margaret had continued, ignoring Malcolm’s remark. She was well aware of Stephen Hardy’s gang affiliations—knew him better than most of the teachers. She had joined the school fresh out of college, as an English teacher, but had soon moved into the Learning

Support Unit. The unit often worked with children with behavioral problems who had to be removed from mainstream classes, and she had been shocked by the number of children who couldn’t even read or write. She had taught Stephen since his first year, when she discovered that, at the age of thirteen,

he still couldn’t write his own address. She had tutored him for two years until he was back in normal classes and had been so proud of him when he got his GCSEs.

“He was carrying a knife in school. It’s a simple case as far as I can see. He’s nearly seventeen years old and—” “It feels like you’re condemning him. This is coming at the worst time—he’s started his A Levels and he’s making such good progress. This’ll shatter his confidence.”

“We can’t have knives in school.”

“He wasn’t brandishing the knife. It was discovered by accident at the gym. You know he carries it for protection, nothing more.”


Reprinted courtesy of HarperCollins Publishers.


Lisa Ballantyne ap1 (1)Lisa Ballantyne is the author of the Edgar Award-nominated The Guilty One. She spent most of her twenties working and living in China, before returning to the UK in 2002. She lives in Glasgow, Scotland.







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